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150 Years of Brewing in Jersey - £1.30 Sheet

150 Years of Brewing in Jersey - £1.30 Sheet

£13.00

The £1.30 stamp from our '150 Years of Brewing in Jersey' issue illustrates the finished product; a perfect pint of beer, against the beautiful Jersey backdrop of Mont Orgueil Castle.

Date of issue 05-10-2021
Withdrawal date 05-10-2023
Designer Chris Wormell
Size 30mm x 40mm
Process four colour process lithography
Denominations £1.30

Additional Information

Brewing is an important part of Jersey’s cultural heritage and can be traced back 150 years to 1871 when the Ann Street brewing operation in St Helier, the Island’s capital, was started by a Mr J S Palmer. He had a vision to rival the best British brews of the time by creating ‘prime ales and porter of superior quality’.

Today known as the Liberation Brewery (and part of the Liberation Group), it has surpassed those initial goals; becoming part of Channel Island legend and winning numerous national and international awards.

The Ann Street Brewery was rebuilt in the 1930s, and then commandeered during the occupation in the Second World War. During this time, it continued brewing under a German brewer. The 1970s and 80s saw vast expansion for the business, fuelled by popularity amongst tourists. Then, in 2003, the brewery was relocated to Tregear House at Longueville in the eastern parish of St Saviour and in 2009, it became Liberation Brewery.

Brewing is, and always has been, a labour of love for Jersey’s brewers. Far from a modern production line, today it is still seen very much as a craft and there is a real sense of anticipation and excitement for the finished product, knowing that not every brew will taste exactly the same. The passion, skill and care that goes into each brew is evident, not least through the numerous national and international awards that Jersey’s beers have won. 

In today’s production process, Liberation’s brewers will eagerly tell you the brewery has its own well which provides the water for the beer, and they make their own yeast; adding to its unique flavour.

This traditional craft is celebrated through this issue on six stamps and a Miniature Sheet. Illustrated by Chris Wormell. They depict the raw ingredients and six different stages in the brewing process, as well as a typical 1920s transport vehicle in the courtyard of the brewery.

Additional Information

Brewing is an important part of Jersey’s cultural heritage and can be traced back 150 years to 1871 when the Ann Street brewing operation in St Helier, the Island’s capital, was started by a Mr J S Palmer. He had a vision to rival the best British brews of the time by creating ‘prime ales and porter of superior quality’.

Today known as the Liberation Brewery (and part of the Liberation Group), it has surpassed those initial goals; becoming part of Channel Island legend and winning numerous national and international awards.

The Ann Street Brewery was rebuilt in the 1930s, and then commandeered during the occupation in the Second World War. During this time, it continued brewing under a German brewer. The 1970s and 80s saw vast expansion for the business, fuelled by popularity amongst tourists. Then, in 2003, the brewery was relocated to Tregear House at Longueville in the eastern parish of St Saviour and in 2009, it became Liberation Brewery.

Brewing is, and always has been, a labour of love for Jersey’s brewers. Far from a modern production line, today it is still seen very much as a craft and there is a real sense of anticipation and excitement for the finished product, knowing that not every brew will taste exactly the same. The passion, skill and care that goes into each brew is evident, not least through the numerous national and international awards that Jersey’s beers have won. 

In today’s production process, Liberation’s brewers will eagerly tell you the brewery has its own well which provides the water for the beer, and they make their own yeast; adding to its unique flavour.

This traditional craft is celebrated through this issue on six stamps and a Miniature Sheet. Illustrated by Chris Wormell. They depict the raw ingredients and six different stages in the brewing process, as well as a typical 1920s transport vehicle in the courtyard of the brewery.


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