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Popular Culture - The 1970s - Miniature Sheet

Popular Culture - The 1970s - Miniature Sheet

£2.00

The miniature sheet illustration reimagines Jersey’s main shopping area as it would have been in the 1970s. The design reflects the vibrancy, fashion and colours synonymous with the decade, whilst the shop fronts are representative of the types of shops that would have existed on King Street and Queen Street at the time.

Date of issue 18/01/2019
Withdrawal date 18/01/2021
Designer Hat-trick Design
Size 94mm x 131mm; stamp within 72mm x 72mm
Process Four colour offset lithography
Denominations £3

Additional Information

Popular culture in Jersey, as in Britain, changed significantly during the 1970s. In contrast to the psychedelic sixties, the seventies was a decade characterised by an earthy colour palette of brown, orange and green. It was a decade of social, political and economic change. Society began to rebel against the commercial and materialistic ways of the 1960s and punk music became a voice for these anti-establishment sentiments. Elsewhere, flared trousers, fondue dinners and roller-discos were all the rage, whilst the technological breakthrough of home video recording meant that, for the first time, people could document their day to day lives through film.

Additional Information

Popular culture in Jersey, as in Britain, changed significantly during the 1970s. In contrast to the psychedelic sixties, the seventies was a decade characterised by an earthy colour palette of brown, orange and green. It was a decade of social, political and economic change. Society began to rebel against the commercial and materialistic ways of the 1960s and punk music became a voice for these anti-establishment sentiments. Elsewhere, flared trousers, fondue dinners and roller-discos were all the rage, whilst the technological breakthrough of home video recording meant that, for the first time, people could document their day to day lives through film.